Minister of Aviation backs down on airlines ban threat

Minister of Aviation, Stella Oduah, will not enforce a ban on British Airways, Virgin Atlantic and other foreign airlines if they fail to lower their first and business class ticket fares. A thirty-day ultimatum given to the airlines to this end last month expires today.

The special Assistant on Media to the Minister of Aviation, Mr. Joe Obi, [said] that the ban can no longer take effect because the matter is now beyond the Aviation Ministry, adding that today has not yet ended. “Today has not ended. But, it is no longer a Ministry of Aviation matter as the Senate has intervened and it will be very disrespectful and prejudicial to the institution of the Senate to enforce the ban while they are still investigating the matter,” he said.

Meanwhile, the NCAA has released new guidelines for both domestic and foreign airlines:

  • Every airline shall file every tariff, whether seasonal, discounted, promotional or otherwise and provide within the tariff, the different specific classes or type of passenger service (that is first class, business class, economy or whatever other class or type of service, the availability, the type of aircraft and the seating configuration used on such aircraft for each class or type of passenger service.
  • The filed tariffs shall, in all cases, include all booking classes, available within the different travel classes or cabins and the specific fare for that booking class including all applicable terms and conditions.
  • Every airline shall immediately remove any distinction between surcharges and base fare on their tickets and cargo sales (excluding any third party fees or taxes) and have one single integrated fare.
  • Other than approved statutory taxes, which are collected only on behalf of appropriate regulatory authorities, every other component of the cost of travel shall be included in the single integrated fare.
  • Every airline shall provide within its tariff in relation to the different specific classes or types of passenger service, the integrated fare applicable, its availability, the existence of special or promotional fares, and the general fare basis code and lastly that-
  • Every airline shall file with the Authority, its tariffs in the form prescribed (to be provided by NCAA) and may publish, sell, implement, enforce or otherwise market the said tariffs upon the approval of the Authority.
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5 responses to “Minister of Aviation backs down on airlines ban threat”

  1. Eze says :

    I am wondering in which country in the world does a Civil Aviation Authority meddle into airlines’ pricing strategies and structures? An airline must get each of its tarriffs approved? Some long-haul carriers have dozens of fares available on the same flight, of course each with conditions of carriage among obvious differences like seat pitch, minimum stay over, etc. Will the NCAA have to approve each and every fare? This is…mind-boggling! A policy which will not last. Rather than meddle into airline tariffs, the Authority, FAAN, Ministry of Aviation, and the government at large, are better advised to build world-class infrastructure and foster an environment of competition.

    • Aviation in Nigeria says :

      The Ministery of Aviation and the NCAA could certainly use some good advisors.

    • Anonymous says :

      Too bad they do things like this and end up looking like clowns afterwards. Let them work on some thing as basic as restoring Lagos as relible fuel reserve and strategic diversion airport in the region as well as fix, xix and yet again, fix the rundown infrastructure.

  2. Anonymous says :

    I WONDER WHY NIGERIA DOMESTIC AIRLINES HIDE THEIR FARES ON THE WEB OR VIA TEXT SENT TO CUSTOMERS. IS IT A NIGERIAN FACTOR OF 419. TO WORSEN IT NO ADVANCE TICKET BOOKING DISCOUNTS WHICH IS A NORM ALL OVER THE WORLD. CANT WE CHANGE FOR ONCE?

  3. Shabilin says :

    we can do better than price list. our aviation sector in nija needs help, pls let us reason d way forward rather than excersing power.

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